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Psychology

Enhance mental health and well-being in your community. Learn techniques and skills to help people solve problems.

Study the normal and abnormal human (and animal) behaviour and the related psychological, social, and biological processes.

The program provides students with a good foundation in the scientific approach as well as in various content areas. Students are required to take Introduction to Psychology, Introduction to Statistics and Scientific Method and Analysis II and Fundamentals of Psychometrics. Other choices include but are not limited to Developmental Psychology, Sensation and Perception, Brain and Behavior, Emotion, Topics in Cognitive Psychology, Learning, and Psychopathology.

Students can complete their studies online in the following: Concentration, and Minor.

Conseiller aux études

Cynthia Whissell, Acting Chair

Téléphone : 705.675.1151 x 4251

Courriel : cwhissell@laurentian.ca

Bureau : Administrative Assistant: Nancy St-Amour, 705.675.1151 x 4240, jj_mathieu@laurentian.ca

Comment faire une demande Ce programme vous intéresse?
Vue aérienne de l'Université Laurentienne
Le Grand Sudbury est la plus vaste ville en Ontario par superficie terrestre, où les activités de plein air ne manquent pas grâce aux lacs et cours d’eau, terrains variés, forêts et réseaux complets de pistes et de sentiers.
Méthode de livraison : Sur campus/en ligne
Langue du programme : Anglais

Interesting Facts:

Psychologists may specialize in many different areas such as development, education, memory, motivation, learning, and cognition. As scientists, psychologists conduct research following the scientific method and use of observation, experimentation, and statistical analysis to evaluate the results. Psychologists conduct both basic and applied research. All psychologists are trained first as scientists. This is what sets psychologists apart from other professionals.

As a profession, practitioner psychologists are well skilled in a diversity of techniques to help people solve problems. These may include personal problems related to mental health and adjustment. Psychologists diagnose and treat mental health problems as well as work toward prevention and mental well-being. They measure intelligence and personality. Psychologists may also consult schools to improve educational techniques or enhance learning in students, or organizations on industrial problems such as personnel issues and technology. In Ontario, the practice of psychology is regulated by the Health Professions Act (1991).

Psychologists teach and conduct research in universities. University professors have doctoral (PhD) degrees in psychology or related fields. Some university psychologists are scientist-practitioners. Psychologists do research in other settings as well; for example, they may work for police forces, the armed services, correctional settings, or health agencies. Other psychologists may work in varied settings such as laboratories, industry, hospitals, government, mental health centres, schools, the legal system, and in private practice.

 

Program Highlights:

  • Students earn a degree in either arts or science (see Psychology B.Sc. – offered in Sudbury only – under the Faculty of Science, Engineering and Architecture).

  • Three- and four-year programs lead to a Bachelor of Arts (Sudbury/Barrie); a four-year program leads to a Bachelor of Science in Psychology.

  • Choice of courses in behavioural neuroscience, emotion, cognition, development, education, forensic psychology, learning, motivation, personality and adjustment, psychological psychology, psychopathology, receptor processes and perception, social psychology, and statistics.

  • Also available: Bachelor of Arts in Sport Psychology in Sudbury only (with School of Human Kinetics). Students choose to study psychology because they find the discipline fascinating and they want to learn how and why they and others think and behave the way they do, and why they react as they do to situations and to one another.

 

Relevant graduate study opportunities at Laurentian:

  • Masters of Arts in Psychology (Applied, Experimental)

  • Master of Arts in Interdisciplinary Health

  • Master of Science in Interdisciplinary Health

Ontario High School Applicants

Bachelor of Arts (BA) Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.)
1 grade 12 English U/M course 1 grade 12 English U/M course
5 other grade 12 U/M courses 1 grade 12 4U Advanced Functions
  1 grade 12 U/M Science course
  1 additional grade 12 U/M Math or Science course
  2 other grade 12 U/M courses
A minimum overall average of 70% in the 6 best grade 12 U/M courses A minimum overall average of 70% in the 6 best grade 12 U/M courses


Additional information for applicants who have completed Advanced Placement courses.

Additional information for applicants who have completed the International Baccalaureate.

 

Applicants from outside an Ontario High School 

International Students

Canadian High School Applicants from outside Ontario

Applicants from Colleges

Applicants from other Universities

Mature Students

Note pour les étudiants actuels

Les options de grade ci-dessous seront offertes lors de la prochaine année universitaire et ne le sont pas cette année. Si vous cherchez les cours à suivre afin de compléter les options d'un programme d'une année universitaire antérieure, svp consultez avec un conseiller académique.


Bachelor of Arts (Honours) or Bachelor of Science (Honours) in Psychology

Total 120 credits

Students must follow these regulations in order to meet graduation requirements for the BA or B.Sc.

All students entering a BA program as of September 2017 are required to take 6 credits each of linguistic awareness, scientific literacy and indigenous content as per the regulations. Eligible courses are available at the 1000, 2000, 3000 and 4000 levels and students should take them at the appropriate time in their studies.

Courses fulfilling these requirements may be taken as electives or as part of a minor, concentration, major or specialization. 

 

Honours Specialization in Psychology (non-Thesis) (BA)  (ALSO OFFERED ONLINE)

Major in Psychology with over 6.5 cumulative GPA (75% average) in PSYC credits 

PSYC 4115E     Major Paper

6 additional PSYC credits at the 3000 or 4000 level

Note:   

  • Students may not exceed 42 credits at the 1000 or 9100 level in their degree program.
  • Students require a minimum GPA of 5.5 on PSYC courses.
  • Students require a minimum GPA of 5.5 to be eligible for the Honours designation.
  • Those who have a GPA below 5.5 will receive a BA as opposed to an Honours BA.

 

Honours Specialization in Psychology with Thesis (BA)

Major in Psychology with over 6.5 cumulative GPA (75% average) in PSYC credits 

PSYC 3256E     Design and Analysis I, with minimum grade of C

PSYC 4105E     Honours Thesis

3 additional credits of research/research methods courses from:

     COSC 2836E     Computer Software for Sciences

     COSC 2836E     Logiciels pour les sciences

     COST 3127E     Communication Research

     GERO 3206E     Ethnogerontology

     ISWK 3555E     Indigenous Social Work Research Methodologies

     PSYC 3156E     Basic Research Practicum

     PSYC 3607E     Psychopathologie II

     PSYC 3707E     Laboratory in Cognitive Psychology

     PSYC 3807E     Social Psychology II

     SESO 3555E     Initiation aux méthodes de recherche en service social

     SOCI 3005E     Survey Research: A Course in Applied Sociology

     SOCI 3126E     Qualitative Methods

 

Honours Specialization in Psychology - with Thesis (B.Sc.)

**Student must have at least 50% of credits from the Sciences in order to get the B.Sc.

a) 18 credits from:

     BIOL 1506E     Biology I

     BIOL 1507E     Biology II

     MATH 1036E     Calculus I (Prereq: ≥ 60% in Grade 12 4U Advanced Functions or MATH 1912E)

     MATH 1037E     Calculus II   OR   MATH 1057E     Linear Algebra I

     *CHMI 1006E     General Chemistry I (Prereq: Grade 12 4U Chemistry or CHMI 1041)

     *CHMI 1007E     General Chemistry II

     **PHYS 1006E     Introductory Physics I   OR   **PHYS 1206E     Physics for the Life Sciences I

     **PHYS 1007E     Introductory Physics II   OR   **PHYS 1207E     Physics for the Life Sciences II

b) All requirements for the Major in Psychology (42 cr, B+ or 75%) 

c) 9 cr required:

     PSYC 3256E     Design and Analysis I (C or 60%)

     PSYC 4105E      Honours Thesis

d) 3 cr from Approved Course List (research/research methods):

     COSC 2836E     Computer Software for Sciences

     COSC 2836F     Logiciels pour les Sciences

     COST 3127E     Communication Research

     GERO 3206E     Ethnogerontology

     ISWK 3555E     Indigenous Social Work Research Methodologies

     PSYC 3156E     Basic Research Practicum

     PSYC 3607E     Laboratory in Cognitive Psychology

     PSYC 3807E     Social Psychology II

     SESO 3555F     Initiation aux méthodes de recherche en service social

     SOCI 3005E     Survey Research: A Course in Applied Sociology

     SOCI 3126E     Qualitative Methods

NOTE: Students may fulfill this requirement with another course with the approval of the Chair of the Department of Psychology

e) 48 cr of electives***

*Prereq. for Chemistry and Biochemistry 2000/3000/4000 level courses.

**Prereq. for Physics and Biophysics 2000/3000/4000 level courses.

***A minimum of 60 Science credits (including the 18 first year science credits) are required to satisfy the BSc regulations. Note that some of the Group II PSYC courses may be counted as Science credits.

 

NOTE: If students are planning to pursue psychology graduate studies and become registered with the College of Psychologists they should read the requirements for courses on the College’s Website in the province they wish to register in. For example, in Ontario it is suggested that students complete a course in the ‘biological basis of behaviour’, ‘social basis of behaviour’, ‘cognitive-affective bases of behaviour’, ‘psychology of the individual’ either at the undergraduate or graduate level to register as a Psychology Associate, and to register as a Psychologist it also includes ‘historical and scientific foundations of psychology’.

 

Honours Specialization in Psychology - non-Thesis (B.Sc.)

a) 18 credits from:

     BIOL 1506E     Biology I

     BIOL 1507E     Biology II

     MATH 1036E     Calculus I (Prereq: ≥ 60% in Grade 12 4U Advanced Functions or MATH 1912E)

     MATH 1037E     Calculus II   OR   MATH 1057E     Linear Algebra I

     *CHMI 1006E     General Chemistry I (Prereq: Grade 12 4U Chemistry or CHMI 1041)

     *CHMI 1007E     General Chemistry II

     **PHYS 1006E     Introductory Physics I   OR   **PHYS 1206E     Physics for the Life Sciences I

     **PHYS 1007E     Introductory Physics II   OR   **PHYS 1207E     Physics for the Life Sciences II

b) All requirements for the Major in Psychology (42 cr, B+ or 75%)

c) 6 cr required: PSYC 4115E     Major Paper

d) 6 cr PSYC at the 3000/4000 level

e) 48 cr of electives***

*Prereq. for Chemistry and Biochemistry 2000/3000/4000 level courses.

**Prereq. for Physics and Biophysics 2000/3000/4000 level courses.

***A minimum of 60 Science credits (including the 18 first year science credits) are required to satisfy the BSc regulations. Note that some of the Group II PSYC courses may be counted as Science credits.

 

NOTE: If students are planning to pursue psychology graduate studies and become registered with the College of Psychologists they should read the requirements for courses on the College’s Website in the province they wish to register in. For example, in Ontario it is suggested that students complete a course in the ‘biological basis of behaviour’, ‘social basis of behaviour’, ‘cognitive-affective bases of behaviour’, ‘psychology of the individual’ either at the undergraduate or graduate level to register as a Psychology Associate, and to register as a Psychologist it also includes ‘historical and scientific foundations of psychology’.

 

Major in Psychology (BA or B.Sc.)   (B.A. ALSO OFFERED ONLINE)

Students selecting this option receive a 4 year non-thesis degree.

PSYC 1105E     Introduction to Psychology (minimum grade of C)

STAT 2126E      Introduction to Statistics (minimum grade of C)

PSYC 2127E     Scientific Method and Analysis II

PSYC 3206E     Fundamentals of Psychometrics

6 credits from PSYC Group I

6 credits from PSYC Group II

6 PSYC credits at the 4000 level

9 additional upper year PSYC credits

78 elective credits*

Notes:

  • In order to get a BA, students must include 6 credits in linguistic awareness, 6 credits of Indigenous content, and 6 credits in the Sciences if not part of the other minor or second major. Eligible courses are available at the 1000, 2000, 3000 and 4000 levels and students should take them at the appropriate time in their studies.
  • Students must complete a minimum of a minor (24 credits) or a second major (42 credits) from among their elective credits
  • Students may not exceed 42 credits at the 1000 or 9100 level in their degree program.
  • Students require a minimum GPA of 3.5 on PSYC courses.
  • Maximum of 78 credits from PSYC courses

 

Bachelor of Arts (General) in Psychology

Total 90 credits

Students must follow these regulations in order to meet graduation requirements for the BA or B.Sc.

 

Concentration in Psychology  (ALSO OFFERED ONLINE)

All students entering a BA program as of September 2017 are required to take 6 credits each of linguistic awareness, scientific literacy and indigenous content as per the regulations.

Although the requirements have been slotted in first year in the description below, students may fulfill them at any time during their studies.

Eligible courses are available at the 1000, 2000, 3000 and 4000 levels and students should take them at the appropriate time in their studies.

Courses fulfilling these requirements may be taken as electives or as part of a minor, concentration, major or specialization. 

First year

PSYC 1105E     Introduction to Psychology (minimum grade of C)
6 elective credits of linguistic awareness (see regulations)
6 elective credits in the Sciences
6 elective credits in Indigenous content (starting 2017)**

6 elective credits


Upper Years

STAT 2126E     Introduction to Statistics (minimum grade of C)

PSYC 2127E     Scientific Method and Analysis II

PSYC 3206E     Fundamentals of Psychometrics

6 PSYC credits at the 3000or 4000 level

15 upper year PSYC credits

30 elective credits

Note:   

  • Students may not exceed 42 credits at the 1000 or 9100 level in their degree program
  • Maximum of 48 credits from PSYC courses
  • A minimum PSYC average of 3.5 is required to graduate

 

Minor in Psychology  (ALSO OFFERED ONLINE)

 

PSYC 1105E     Introduction to Psychology

STAT 2126E      Introduction to Statistics  

     OR   STAT 2606E    Business Statistics (If STAT 2606E is taken, student must take an extra 3 credits in PSYC)

9 credits from PSYC Group I

6 additional upper year PSYC credits

 

Minor in Experimental Psychology

PSYC 1105E     Introduction to Psychology (minimum grade of C)

STAT 2126E     Introduction to Statistics II (minimum grade of C)

PSYC 2127E     Scientific Method and Analysis

9 credits from the following:

     PSYC 2606E     Brain & Behaviour
     PSYC 2617E     Human Neuropsychology

     PSYC 2656E     Physiological Psychology
     PSYC 2905E     Receptor Processes & Perception

     PSYC 2917E     Sensation and Perception
     PSYC 3106E     Evolutionary Psychology
     PSYC 3307E     Laboratory in Learning & Memory

     PSYC 3506E     Neuropharmacology
      PSYC 3507E     Behavioural Neurobiology

      PSYC 3706E     Topics in Cognitive Psychology
      PSYC 3707E     Laboratory in Cognitive Psychology

      PSYC 3757E     Sleep and Dreaming

   3 additional PSYC credits. 

Note that a minimum of 6 credits must be at the 3000 or 4000 level 

 

Minor in Health and Disability


Students must have completed PSYC 1105 in order to choose this minor

PSYC 2005E     Developmental Psychology

9 credits from:

     PSYC 3556E     Health Psychology

     PSYC 4206E     Adolescent and Adult Clinical Psychology   OR   PSYC 4207E     Clinical Child Psychology

     PSYC 4336E     Developmental Disabilities

     SWLF 3736E     Critical Perspectives on Disability

9 credits from:*

     ANTR 3047E     Public Health and Epidemiology

     ANTR 3086E     Medical Anthropology: Medicine, Culture and Society

     BIOL 2011E     Fundamentals of Genetics

     BIOL 2757E     Biological Aspects of Human Sexuality

     ENVI 2536E     Environment and Human Health

     GERO 2226E     End-of-Life: Care with Older Adults

     GERO 3207E     Health Challenges in Aging

     GERO 3306E     Dementia Studies

     GERO 3327E     Mental Health and Aging

     ISWK 4426E     Mental Health Policy and Services – the Indigenous Context

     LBST/SOCI 2026E     The World of Work     

     LBST/SOCI 3246E     Workplace Rights Advocacy

     SOCI 2296E     Sociology of Educational Issues

     SOCI 2636E     Desire, Love, and Work I: the Social Making of Gender

     SOCI/LBST 3246E     Workplace Rights Advocacy

     SOCI 3636E     Desire, Love and Work II: the Social Making of Sexuality

     SOCI 4086E     Class, Race, Gender and Ethnicity in the Workplace

     WGSX 2036E     Gender, Work and families

     WGSX 2296E     Gender Issues in Education

     WGSX 2356E     Reproduction and Mothering

     WGSX 2456E     Women’s Health Issues

     WGSX 3306E     Female Sexualities

* Students must complete courses from a minimum of two subject areas

Note:    Students should verify the prerequisites for any of the above courses in planning their course selection

 

Minor in Intergroup Relations
- Courses must include at least 6 credits from each of 3 different subject areas
- Courses may include a maximum of 9 credits from a single subject area
- A minimum of 6 credits must be from the 3rd or 4th year level
- Courses from a student’s major area of study cannot be counted toward the minor
 
ENGL 2005E     Literatures in English (6 credits)
ENGL 3157E     16th and 17th Century Women's Writers (3 credits)
ENGL 3215E     Literature of the Romantic Period (6 credits)
ENGL 3305E     Post-Colonial Literary Studies (6 credits)
ENGL 3316E     Modern and Contemporary Drama (3 credits)
ENGL 3317E     Contemporary Drama (3 credits)
ENGL 3465E     American Literature to 1865 (6 credits)
ENGL 3485E     Modern and Contemporary American Writers (6 credits)
HIST 2446E     War and Society in Twentieth Century Britain (3 credits)
HIST 3176E     Canada in World Affairs (3 credits)
HIST 3216E     The First Nations in Canada in Historical Perspective (3 credits)
HIST 3286E     Canadian Military History (3 credits)
HIST 3526E     The United States in the Twentieth Century World (3 credits)
HIST 3806E     History of Revolutions (3 credits)
HIST 3807E      Revolutions in the Twentieth Century (3 credits)
HIST 3846E      Pre-Modern War (3 credits)
HIST 3847E      Modern War (3 credits)
HIST 4125E     Canada and War 1914-1945 (6 credits)
HIST 4606E      French Revolution: Origins to Thermidor (3 credits)
INDG 1116E     Foundations of Indigenous Peoplehood (3 credits)
INDG 1117E     Implications of Indigenous Peoplehood (3 credits)
INDG 2136E     Indigenous Political Resistance in Canada
INDG 3105E     Canadian Law, Politics, and Indigenous People in Canada
INDG 3226E     Indigenous Critical Theory
ISWK 2006E     Indigenous Social Welfare Issues (3 credits)
POLI 2306E     International Relations (3 credits)
POLI 4216E     Nationalism (3 credits)
POLI 4267E     Sucession (3 credits)
POLI 3307E     Turbulence and Conflict in World Politics (3 credits)
POLI 3316E     Regional Governance: The European Union (3 credits)
POLI 3317E     Global Governance:  The United Nations System (3 credits)
POLI 3437E     The Colonizer and the Colonized (3 credits)
PSYC 3806E     Social Psychology I (3 credits)
PSYC 3807E     Social Psychology II (3 credits) 
PSYC 4065E     Psychology of Intergroup Relations (newly approved course) (3 credits)
SOCI 2656E     Social Inequality:  Gender, Race, Class & Power (3 credits)
SOCI 3016E     Modern Sociological Theories: Manifestations and Issues (3 credits)
SOCI 3056E     News, Pop Culture, and Power: Critical Perspectives on Mass Media (3 credits)
SOCI 3086E     Sociology of Law (3 credits)
SOCI 3136E     Sociology of Self, Mind and Identity (3 credits)
SOCI 3296E     Sociology of Education (3 credits)
SOCI 3306E     Globalization and the New World Order (3 credits)
WGSX 2036E     Gender, Work & Families (3 credits)
WGSX 2046E     Gender, Race & Racism (3 credits)
WGSX 2406E     Violence Against Women (3 credits)
 

Certificate in Social Research Methods (30 credits)
If your concentration, major or speciaIization is in the Social sciences, you can obtain a BA and a Certificate in Social Research without any additional courses
I. STATISTICS (3 credits required) One of the following:
     STAT 2126E     Introduction to Statistics
     ECON 2136E     Statistical Methods for Economics
     STAT 2066E     Business Statistics
     STAT 2246E     Statistics for Scientists
II. MATHEMATICS (3 credits required) One of the following:
     ECON 2127E     Introduction to the Mathematical Treatment of Economics
     MATH 1911E     Finite Mathematics
     MATH 1912E     Elementary Calculus
     MATH 1057E     Linear Algebra I
     MATH 1036E     Calculus I
III. QUANTITATIVE METHODS ( 9 credits required)
     ECON 3466E     Introduction to Econometrics
     ECON 3476E     Mathematical Economics I
     PSYC 2127E     Scientific Method and Analysis II
     PSYC 3156E     Basic Research Practicum
     PSYC 3256E     Design and Analysis I
     GERO 3126E     Applied Research Methods in Gerontology I
     GERO 3127E     Applied Research Methods in Gerontology II
     SOCI 3005E     Survey Research: A Course in Applied Sociology
     SOCI 4026E     Quantitative Methods
IV. QUALITATIVE METHODS (6 credits required)
     SOCI 2127E     Research Methods and Data Analysis
     SOCI 3126E     Qualitative Methods
     INDG 3215E     Indigenous Community-Based Research Methods
     ISWK 3555E     Indigenous Social Work Research Methodologies
     HIST 2026E     Historical Methods
     WGSX 2016E     Production of Knowledge
     ANTR 3026E     Anthropological Research: Project Design
     ENVI 4695EL Environmental Community Research
V. SPATIAL METHODS (6 credits required)
     GEOG 2017E     Applied Cartography and Introduction to GIS
     GEOG 2037E     Introduction to Remote Sensing
     GEOG 3056E     Topics in Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Application
     GEOG 4057E    Senior Topics in Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Spatial Analysis
VI. PRESENTATION AND COMMUNICATION SKILLS (3 credits required)
     SCOM 4006E     Presenting and Communicating Research
Prerequisites for the Certificate:
     SOCI 1015E   OR   PSYC 1105E
     ECON 1006/1007E

Note : A minimum of 6 credits of the selected courses must be at the 3000-level or above.

 

 


PSYC Group I

     PSYC 2005E     Developmental Psychology

     PSYC 2706E     Emotion

     PSYC 2707E     Motivation

     PSYC 3006E     Personality and Adjustment

     PSYC 3605E     Psychopathology

     PSYC 3805E     Social Psychology   OR   PSYC 3806E     Social Psychology I

 


PSYC Group II

     BIOL 4717E     Animal Behaviour

     PSYC 2606E     Brain and Behaviour

     PSYC 2617E     Human Neuropsychology

     PSYC 2656E     Physiological Psychology

     PSYC 2905E     Receptor Processes and Perception

     PSYC 2917E     Sensation and Perception

     PSYC 3106E     Evolutionary Psychology

     PSYC 3306E     Learning

     PSYC 3307E     Laboratory in Learning and Memory

     PSYC 3506E     Neuropharmacology

     PSYC 3507E     Behavioural Neurobiology

     PSYC 3706E     Topics in Cognitive Psychology

     PSYC 3707E     Laboratory in Cognitive Psychology

     PSYC 3757E     Sleep and Dreaming

     PSYC 3937E     Sensation and Perception

     PSYC 4506E     Advanced Experimental Psychology I

     PSYC 4507E     Advanced Experimental Psychology II

PSYC-1105EL - Introduction to Psychology PSYC-2005EL - Developmental Psychology PSYC-2127EL - Scientific Method and Analysis II PSYC-2316EL - Indigenous Perspectives on Psychology PSYC-2606EL - Brain and Behaviour PSYC-2617EL - Human Neuropsychology PSYC-2656EL - Physiological Psychology PSYC-2706EL - Emotion PSYC-2707EL - Motivation STAT-2126EL - Introduction to Statistics PSYC-3006EL - Personality and Adjustment PSYC-3106EL - Evolutionary Psychology PSYC-3156EL - Basic Research Practicum PSYC-3206EL - Fundamentals of Psychometrics PSYC-3256EL - Design and Analysis I PSYC-3257EL - Design and Analysis II PSYC-3306EL - Learning PSYC-3307EL - Laboratory in Learning and Memory PSYC-3406EL - Psychology of Education PSYC-3506EL - Neuropharmacology PSYC-3507EL - Behavioural Neurobiology PSYC-3556EL - Health Psychology PSYC-3605EL - Psychopathology PSYC-3706EL - Topics in Cognitive Psychology PSYC-3707EL - Laboratory in Cognitive Psychology
PSYC-3757EL - Sleep and Dreaming PSYC-3806EL - Social Psychology I PSYC-3807EL - Social Psychology II PSYC-3906EL - Special Topics in Psychology I PSYC-3906EL - Special Topics in Psychology III PSYC-3916EL - Advanced Readings in Psychology PSYC-3917EL - Special Projects Course PSYC-3937EL - Sensation and Perception PSYC-4006EL - History of Psychology PSYC-4007EL - Contemporary Theory and Research in Psychology PSYC-4026EL - Forensic Psychology PSYC-4066EL - Culture and Psychology PSYC-4105EL - Honours Thesis PSYC-4115EL - Major Paper PSYC-4206EL - Adolescent and Adult Clinical Psychology PSYC-4207EL - Clinical Child Psychology PSYC-4306EL - Advanced Child Psychology I PSYC-4307EL - Advanced Child Psychology II PSYC-4326EL - Development Psychology Practicum PSYC-4336EL - Developmental Disabilities PSYC-4506EL - Advanced Experimental Psychology I Language PSYC-4507EL - Advanced Experimental Psychology II PSYC-4706EL - Advanced Neuroanatomy PSYC-4707EL - Behaviour and the Electromagnetic Chemical Basis of Behaviour PSYC-4907EL - Current Developments in the Neurosciences

Liste des membres du corps professoral

Sessional Faculty

  • Blake Dotta
  • Robert Duck
  • Angela Eke
  • Jamie-Lyn Flesch
  • Mark Fraser
  • Garg, Rashmi
  • Susan Graham-Clay
  • Katherine Harper
  • Ryan Kneer
  • Rose-Ann Kozinski
  • Charles Lachance
  • Christian Laforge
  • Robert Lafrenie
  • Matias Mariani
  • Anna-Liisa Mottonen
  • Annie Pelletier
  • Lucie Sabel
  • Linda St-Pierre
  • Diana Urajnik
  • Ljiljana Vuletic
  • Erin White